Friday, August 31, 2012

NEW ORLEANS - THE COMMUNAL SOUL OF A NATION





NEW ORLEANS - THE COMMUNAL SOUL OF A NATION

Individual souls may take birth in such a location not only to fulfill their own destiny and Divine purpose, but also to assist on a larger scale, offering their sacrifice in service to a larger purpose that pertains to the nation as a whole.
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There are places in the world that represent the ideals of a nation.  They hold an energy and vibration of what that nation is meant to become.  Sometimes they hold this in a positive way by showing what these ideals might look like in manifestation.  In this manner they create art, beauty, new architectural structures, new ways of people living together, new political forms.

There are other areas of a nation that may hold ideals in a different way, a way that points up what that nation is lacking and what it needs to strive for.  Sometimes great sacrifice is needed when the inhabitants of such an area become the living illustration of what a nation is called to.  In such cases the sacrifice may appear as an extreme version of the need for rectification of a nation's values, practices, or goals that have become out of balance and that have departed from that nation's true promise and destiny.  Individual souls may take birth in such a location not only to fulfill their own destiny and Divine purpose, but also to assist on a larger scale, offering their sacrifice in service to a larger purpose that pertains to the nation as a whole.

It is thus with New Orleans, her inhabitants, and with some of the rest of the Gulf coast as well.  Here, the ideal that is being pointed to both by its presence and by its absence is the ideal of community – the ideal of people caring for one another and taking responsibility for one another.  New Orleans demonstrates this by what she has had to do without due to the limited restoration of her homes, neighborhoods, and structures since Hurricane Katrina.  These are things that she still must do without in many instances, for she has never recovered from that earlier major hurricane.  At the same time and by virtue of this deprivation, the city and its inhabitants are calling the rest of the nation to a sense of communal responsibility.  Through the grit and resilience of its inhabitants, New Orleans continues to rebuild itself, calling many others to help sustain what cannot be sustained on its own.  This call to collective responsibility is the call to the soul of a nation from those who have sacrificed much in order to deliver this message.

At the same time, New Orleans reflects the nature of community built out of shared external hardship, but also out of love and commitment, often deeply religiously based, sometimes based on necessity, to help and sustain one another in the neighborhoods and parishes that make up her various sections. 
The love for communal culture and roots can be nowhere more illustrated that in the stories of those who were forced to leave their homes in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, some of whom have returned, many of whom have not been able to.  Now, once again with Hurricane Isaac, (making landfall in Louisiana on the same date seven years later as Hurricane Katrina), common hardship presents both the local community and the nation with a choice of shared responsibility or one of relative isolation, each from the other, each taking care of their own needs.

This is the message of a city and of a people - of a collective soul that calls to America to listen to the need for re-balancing itself.   New Orleans carries this message to the nation and to the world.  In this sense she is a rallying point for an energy that must be expanded if this country is to become what it is meant to be and what it has promised to be – a home for all people in which life can flourish.



http://lightomega.org/NL/2012-08-31-New-Orleans-Communal-Soul.html

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